The Baker Family

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'The Baker Family' page
Photo: Illustrative image for the 'The Baker Family' page
Photo: Illustrative image for the 'The Baker Family' page
Photo: Illustrative image for the 'The Baker Family' page
Photo:Gran and Grandad Baker, Jen, Joe, Floss and Mum

Gran and Grandad Baker, Jen, Joe, Floss and Mum

Alan Baker

Photo:Grandad Baker in Broadley Street

Grandad Baker in Broadley Street

Alan Baker

Photo:Nan, Grandad and Charlie Plummer 1937

Nan, Grandad and Charlie Plummer 1937

Alan Baker

Photo memories of my family around Church Street

By Alan Baker

The first photograph is of my grandparents with my father and his siblings taken around 1920 I would think. The grandad Baker ones were taken when he worked on Marylebone council.

I can remember buying a shirt in Jordans in the late 1950s, it was green with some sort of shiny thread pattern woven into it and when it was washed it became light green and eventually white after further washes.

I do remember Chocolate Joe but that would also have been in the 50s, the lady in the film was talking about buying sweets for 50p.  Whether this chap was still trading or even alive in the early 70s onwards when we changed the currency, I don’t know.

My first job after leaving school was in an office in Fitzroy Square near Euston Road, very often I used to see Prince Monolulu walking about the area shouting out “I gotta horse” because he used to sell horse racing tips.  This chap used to wear a very colourful oufit with a feathered headdress and he lived in Cleveland Street which is just around the corner to where I worked.

The fifth photograph down isn’t very good quality but is of my dad’s parents, his brother Joe with his wife Jen and his sister Floss together with my late mother.

The sixth photograph down is of my grandfather outside his home at 104 Broadley Street. To his left is a row of shops, the second one up was a newsagents run by a chap whose surname was Crane and I was mates with his son Johnnie.  Next to the newsagents was a funeral directors who I believe was called Francis and I remember that they carried out my grandfather’s funeral in 1947 with a hearse drawn by black horses with black plumes on their heads.

The seventh photograph down is of my gran and grandfather in the back row, presumably outside No. 104. The chap on the left at the back lived next door to them on the top floor of No. 102 but his name escapes me although I do remember that you could hear him in the mornings when he was shaving because he used a Rolls Razor which needed to have the blade sharpened on a leather strop which was built into its case and made a particular noise when being sharpened. The chap in the middle at the front was Charlie Plummer who lived a few doors along the road and generally came to my grandparents on a Saturday night for a chinwag as they had no TV at that time.  My grandfather died in 1947 from lung cancer and my gran went on to 1961 dying from pneumonia and a couple of other things at the age of 71 in St Mary’s hospital.

 

This page was added on 12/10/2011.
Comments about this page

The house with the railings in Broadley Street looks very familiar. I think that my school friend Patricia McCarthy lived there in the sixties. It was a lovely house and seemed quite posh!

By Ann Metcalfe
On 03/05/2013

The sweet shop you're talking about W H Crane is my grandad's shop and Johnnie is my dad, who you knew. The shop was in Broadley Street from the late 1800s and was knocked down to make way for the flats in the late 1960s 

I know my dad had a mate called Jim Mcarthe who lived over the road. Also my dad had a sister called Mo Crane. 

I will have to show this to my dad next when I see him.

By Jason crane
On 22/10/2014

I knew Jimmy Mcarthy in Broadley Street. He was one of my Cubs. If I remember the next house was only a bomb site at the time. I had many Cubs who lived in the same area but have never been able to trace any of them. We were the 4th St. Marylebone (Salvation Army) group. One can only assume that many now in their sixties didn't get involved with computers. I worked at Peter Keevils.

By David Paget
On 03/11/2016

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