Spencer, Turner and Boldero Drapers

Photo:Spencer, Turner and Boldero, Lisson Grove, 1910

Spencer, Turner and Boldero, Lisson Grove, 1910

Westminster City Archives

By Georgina Colbeck

The linen draper's, Spencer, Turner and Boldero, became properly established around 1855 when three independent Master drapers, all working on Lisson Grove, joined together to form one larger firm. From this date on the business expanded rapidly, eventually employing several hundred assistants and needlewomen.

This page was added on 07/05/2011.
Comments about this page

I was aged 15 in 1957 and my first job was at Spencer Turners as a van boy. We delivered clothes and sundries all over london no traffic -great times.

By terry piggott
On 21/04/2012

I worked at Spencer, Turner & Boldero's from 1941 to 1947 in the child's wear department. I worked with Joyce Davis (nee Weatherhead) who had two children called Lyn and Tim. It was bombed in the war and I was watching from the flats opposite (Hubert House - Marylebone Housing Assoc); the fire was very fierce and the big red ledgers were blown through the windows of our flat.

By Cis Anderson nee Bodman
On 12/05/2012

I worked at Spencers from when I left school in the 60s until they closed down. I remember it being a happy place with many local people working there and some people living in company accommodation. I remember there still being gas lights in some parts of the building - though they were trying to modernise. The building had many odd corners and rooms, where some of the buyers would keep secret stocks of drinks for their mason friends. I remember 'Tiny' who used to look after 'goods inwards' - there were many characters there. I worked in Fancy Linens most of the time selling things one never sees now.

By John Briggs
On 21/07/2012

I read with interest information regarding this business because I believe the Turner part of the firm to be my ancestors. My grandfather Charles Stanley Turner was left some money in trust now long gone. Anybody with any knowledge of the Turners please email. Thanks Philip

By Philip Charles Turner
On 19/03/2013

In the 1960s, my father was a self-employed 'Tally Man'. This was the term for someone who dragged all manner of products around the countryside, selling to people in their own homes, and then collecting the money at the rate of one shilling in the pound each week. As far as I recall his main (only?) supplier was STB, the goods arriving via rail to Bedford Station and delivered out to the village by one of those cute British Railways 3-wheel 'tractors' towing a trailer laden with parcels. The Rep for STB was a tall man called Mr Ronald Noakes, who I seem to recall lived in Northampton. I still have a bent wood chair that I think my dad snatched back from a customer who couldn't pay the bill! Selling by this method was very time consuming, and frequently went on very late into the evenings but I guess my old man thought he could talk people into buying. And lots of tea was drunk All a world away! Ian McIver

By Ian McIver
On 17/01/2014

In the 1960s, my father was a self-employed 'Tally Man'. This was the term for someone who dragged all manner of products around the countryside, selling to people in their own homes, and then collecting the money at the rate of one shilling in the pound each week. As far as I recall his main (only?) supplier was STB, the goods arriving via rail to Bedford Station and delivered out to the village by one of those cute British Railways 3-wheel 'tractors' towing a trailer laden with parcels. The Rep for STB was a tall man called Mr Ronald Noakes, who I seem to recall lived in Northampton. I still have a bent wood chair that I think my dad snatched back from a customer who couldn't pay the bill! Selling by this method was very time consuming, and frequently went on very late into the evenings but I guess my old man thought he could talk people into buying. And lots of tea was drunk, all a world away! Ian McIver

By Ian McIver
On 17/01/2014

I worked at Spencer, Turner & Boldero's for 22 years. Mr. Noakes was such a lovely person as were the majority of the people who worked there, for STB's was a real family company. Such a pity Mr. Tom (as he was known) had to retire when he did.

By Doreen Paganini
On 04/03/2014

My sister in law worked there. Her name name was Doreen Patching and she married Len Bunn who I think also worked there. my mum Jessie Watkins also worked there with a friend of ours Cora Barker.

By rita patching [ nee watkins ]
On 04/03/2014

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